Culture: Would you follow a woman leader?

While browsing the God Blog Conference 2006 web page, I came across this item with the provocative title, "Women Leaders: Against Nature?"

The full post can be found at La Shawn Barber's Column.

What she writes definitely will grate on the ears of those who hold to the politically correct view.

But can we deny what she says?

My guts tells me many, if not a majority of, people feel the same.

UPDATE: In my profession, it is still largely male dominated so I can't really speak from much experience on this point from the work context. In the realm of volunteer organizations both secular and religious, I have in those settings experienced women in leadership. Those settings tend not to be as hard charging and more collaborative. In those cases, if the woman leader is competent and fair-minded, I am fine following.

I don't know what it would be like in a setting where there is a greater authority presence required. In all fairness, I would have my doubts that a woman could lead in some situations. For example, could a woman coach a football team?

I don't doubt that a woman could be extremely familiar with all the offensive blocking schemes, receiver patterns and blitz packages. However, could she coach the team effectively? My guts tell me, no.

Comments

Louis said…
Well, let's take your example. Think of a woman who was a trainer in college. Maybe even played in the local youth league. Learned a position and moved up to position coach. And basically worked her way through the system.

Why not? By this point she has learned to command and wield authority over young men the old fashioned way, bit by bit. She knows the game, not from the perspective of the average fan who can give arguements in the large, but someone who knows the game in the small, where the details matter. And nothing I've said above is implausible. If she can command the respect of the players (at least for youth) why not? As you said, knowing defensive and offensive schemes is the easy part. The details and preparation are the hard part, and it is not implausible that a woman could learn that, even when you suppose that women do not play at the college or professional level.